Saturday, December 22, 2012

Layering

I'm all for it. I love layering. I have been rocking the chambray shirt under a sweater, little jacket over a t-shirt, etc. for most of this mild season.

However, as a farmer, layering becomes imperative especially during these first cold winter days. This morning, while Joe was dressing to head outside, he practiced the fashion practice I believe in...only a with a little more function than fashion.

When it's 15 below zero wind chill, Joe says one should always consider the first layer. Like a base layer in running clothes, a good, thin, wicking base layer is imperative. Atop that is a t-shirt and some flannel lined jeans. Think he's done? Nope...Joe considers his farmer fashion options again. While I may be wondering if something makes my behind look fat, or isn't the right cut or color, Joe considers the temperature, wind speed, and wind chill.  If it's truly, truly bitter, then a flannel lined jacket is chosen over the base layer, however a sweatshirt and windbreaker ensemble is completely appropriate if the wind isn't as cold. Considering his own movement the morning, he will decide coat or no coat, but never forgotten are the Carhartt bibs. These dudes complete the ensemble, and must be perfectly broken in, as movement is imperative.

Socks are also to be considered. Like a good pair of shoes, these could make or break an outfit. Depending upon the boots, whether insulated or not, your socks could cause great discomfort if not chosen wisely. So, on a day like today, Joe has chosen thin socks with boots that he calls, "Tundra Boots," meaning boots with a liner. One does not want sweaty feet, so these boots are left for really bitter days...like today.

Finally, head gear...Joe is currently sporting a red Tractor Supply Co. hat, but once he is out in the elements he may be mistaken for a bandit. A bandanna is a multipurpose accessory. It is tied around the neck like a scarf, mostly, but when it's bitterly cold, Joe pulls it up over his face for extra warmth.

This is all for days that are like today, pretty cold, but not super cold.

Bibs that are lined and a big coat are left for those miserable days...even though I think today is pretty miserable, and skipped my run because no amount of layers will keep me warm enough.

It's all about movement. Layers like this require thought, which is something you might not think Joe put a lot into, based on the appearance of cow manure and mud on his bibs, but he really thought about his outfit, bless his heart...it just isn't that obvious, and he shouldn't roll into church or a Christmas party in this get up, but for this morning, it's fabulous.

So, if you ever see a farmer, instead of scoffing at their not-so-fashionable looking get up, ask them to explain their choices. You might be surprised at the answer.




1 comment:

  1. Love this post. Can't judge a book...and all that.

    ReplyDelete